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Sep

1

The Fine Line Between Soul & Spirit

By pastorbillwalden

Sub Title – Are You Primarily A Soulish Person, Or A Spiritual Person?  body-soul-spirit

God sometimes teaches us with illustrations and visible examples.  Jesus used illustrations of farming and nature to make his points.  The Apostle Paul spoke of athletics and the military, as well as alluding to the human body.

The writer of the Book of Hebrews also used the illustration of the human body to present a spiritual truth.

Hebrews 4:12 (NKJV) For the word of God is living and powerful, and sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing even to the division of soul and spirit, and of joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart.

The writer of Hebrews speaks of the nature of God’s Word; that it can cut through our thoughts and intentions.  It can reveal our true motives compared to what we might be saying.  We may verbalize something that is a 90% good thought with a 10% selfish motive.  To the human listener, it may sound 100% good, but God’s word opens us up like a surgeon, and shows us what’s inside of us.

The writer makes two comparisons; he compares two groups of two things that coexist but are not the same.  He says that soul and spirit can be divided, and he says that joints and marrow can be divided.  A consideration of the dividing of joints and marrow will show us a spiritual truth, so we will start there. We’ll start with that which is visible and knowable.

Marrow grows in the bone.  It is not bone, but it grows in the bone. I won’t go into what bone marrow does, but suffice it to say this: marrow grows in the bone but it is not bone, it is marrow.

Here is where things get amazingly interesting: Marrow is separated from bone by a porous membrane one cell thick.  That is the thinnest of membranes possible.  There is virtually almost “nothing” separating bone from marrow, but it is separated, and one is not the other.  I spoke to four physicians about this, including an oncologist and a retired surgeon who teaches.

The writer of Hebrews uses that anatomical truth to illustrate this spiritual truth:  Soul and spirit are as close as they can be, but they are not the same thing.  They almost are the same thing, but they are not the same thing.

That observation begs for definitions, and this is where things can get tricky, but here is what I think.

The soul of a man is that which pertains to all the intangible aspects of that natural (not born again) man. The soul speaks of desire, thoughts, passions, emotions, and the appreciation for art, music, movies.  The soul wants things, rejects other things, likes and hates things, feels things, etc.  It is that part of you that isn’t physical.  It’s that part of you that gets really happy or miserably sad.

The soul can be moved by a good movie, inspired by the Olympics, or enraged at injustice.

Here is another verse that seems to point to the triune nature of man.

1 Thessalonians 5:23 (NKJV) Now may the God of peace Himself sanctify you completely; and may your whole spirit, soul, and body be preserved blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Some say that body and soul are synonymous while others make a differentiation. I am obviously in the camp that believes humans are triune creatures: body, soul and spirit.

For all that the soul is… it isn’t spirit. The spirit seems to be that part of man that is made alive when one becomes “born again”.

John 3:3-8 Jesus answered and said to him, “Most assuredly, I say to you, unless one is born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God.” 4  Nicodemus said to Him, “How can a man be born when he is old? Can he enter a second time into his mother’s womb and be born?” 5  Jesus answered, “Most assuredly, I say to you, unless one is born of water and the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God. 6  That which is born of the flesh is flesh, and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit. 7  Do not marvel that I said to you, ‘You must be born again.’ 8  The wind blows where it wishes, and you hear the sound of it, but cannot tell where it comes from and where it goes. So is everyone who is born of the Spirit.”

I’ll leave you with this observation, and try to develop in more in my next article, but I’ll end with this thought:  If soul and spirit both exist, but are different, then how can we know the difference between a soulish experience and a spiritual experience?

I think that many people wrongly interpret soulish experiences, thinking they are spiritual experiences.

Aug

15

Overculturizing Your Church

By pastorbillwalden

Christianity is a subculture among every greater culture in which it finds itself.  Jesus taught that “narrow is the way that leads to eternal life and few find it”.  The implication is that there are more people that haven’t found Jesus than those who have.  In any given city, there will be more unbelievers than there will be Christians.  Therefore, the Church is a subculture of the greater community in which it is found.vanillaicecream

Then within the Church Universal in any given city, there are different churches, with different philosophies of ministry, different doctrinal emphases, and a different flavor in music, dress, etc.  Each individual church is a subculture of a larger subculture.

I am not suggesting that any Church should conform itself to worldly standards to be more relevant or relateable.  Jesus taught us otherwise…that following Him would actually separate family members.  Every Christian knows that or ought to know that.  Following Jesus puts you in a subculture of the great community you live in.

For me, that’s all OK so far.

Here is my concern…

The Church in its purest form is already a smaller piece of the pie in any given culture, but I find that we often “Gospelize” non-Gospel issues, making ourselves even more unrelatable and marginal than we naturally are or are intended to be.

We have strong opinions on lesser issues, and we go soft on major doctrinal issues and commands.  In my opinion, church leaders or congregants sometimes over-emphasize such issues as home schooling, vaccinations, politics, or support for Israel.  We fight over issues like drinking alcohol or church membership. We hang Israeli flags in our foyers, and then wonder why people of Arab ethnicity are uncomfortable in our churches.  We are blind to the fact that our churches aren’t multi-generational, and if we do see that, we hate making changes to welcome people of others age groups. We forget about loving our neighbors as ourselves.

The phrase is true: “like attracts like” and we usually choose to gather together with people that share more preferences than one might imagine.

The negative result with this can sometimes be a silent or spoken disapproval of others that are not like us, even from Christian to Christian.  It’s not wrong to have strong opinions; it is wrong to over-emphasize secondary preferences.

If we insist on living with the idea of “like attracts like”, we inadvertently reduce our approachability and relatability to others that might simply want to worship God and hear a good Bible study.  We chase them away with our silent or spoken disapproval.

We become a subculture of a subculture of a subculture, and then we wonder why “no one wants to come to our church”.

I believe that the solution to the “overculturizing” of our churches is to have increasingly less absolutes both corporately and individually.  I like to use the phrase “vanilla church”.  When you eat vanilla ice cream, it is suited for any kind of topping you might want add.  I want our church to be as vanilla as possible regarding all secondary issues, but I want us to be deep and strong in the main truths of the Bible.

Being more vanilla on secondary issues means that we need to be more flexible with negotiable things.  It means we forsake personal preferences that matter only to us and our friends.  It means allowing people to all scoop from the same bucket of ice cream, but having a wide variety of toppings for individual taste. (Forgive the food analogies.  It’s how I think)

Instead of overculturizing our churches with secondary and tertiary issues, let’s major on the majors, and let people be free to “work out THEIR OWN salvation with fear and trembling”, without the fear of the disapproval of others in the next pew.

Jun

12

Chicken Legged Disciples

By pastorbillwalden

The world is full of negativity and sadness.  That is a huge understatement.  Even the Church has plenty of sad challenges within its four walls; God’s people are not immune to tragedy and setbacks.  I have pastored since 1989…I have seen much within the church that can break one’s heart. Many times, my heart has been broken over the effects of sin within the church.  

It seems that in the minds of some church leaders, the solution to sadness and negativity is to never talk about it.  I think that the motivation to encourage people is a good intention.  People need to be encouraged, and church is a great place for that to happen.

All that being so, I am concerned about what I believe is an unhealthy trend in many churches.  There is a deliberate avoidance in talking about sin or judgment.  The Body of Christ isn’t warned against straying from God, but instead is taught about how Jesus can improve your life. The unbeliever isn’t warned about fleeing the wrath to come, but is told that Jesus will fill the emptiness of their heart.

I DO believe that Jesus improves the life of His followers, and that he DOES fill a believer’s heart, but that is NOT the full preaching of the Gospel, nor is it the full counsel of the Word of God.

I think that some pastors are failing.

I don’t say that because I feel superior to anyone.  I say that because some pastors are not teaching their congregations all of God’s Word, but only selected portions.  In doing so, they are not making mature disciples, but only meeting the felt needs of the people.  They are teaching from the Bible, but they are not teaching the Bible.  There is a huge difference between those two practices.

Chicken Legged Disciples and the search for deeper teaching…

Read more »

Jun

29

As Long As Nobody Gets Hurt

By pastorbillwalden

“As long as nobody gets hurt” presumes that those mutually participating in something know the entire future of their own or another’s life.  

How can we possibly know the future, and jeopardize it for the moment? We can’t possibly be sure that current actions won’t bring future hurt. Better to trust God than your own logic, IMO.

Sep

26

Where I Stand

By pastorbillwalden

Every Christian must come to a conclusion about what their life will focus on, about what their “battles” will be, about what message they will declare, and about how their voice will be heard. 

There is no shortage of causes and fights that Christians are pursuing in these days in which we live.  I respect and agree with many of the causes being suggested, but I am not inclined to join particular fights in the ways that some might hope.

I am very mindful that I must be careful to not judge the motivations and passion of others regarding their causes.  For those passions and actions, they shall answer to Jesus, and not to me.

I am bothered by many events I see on the political stages of the world.  In fact, I am increasingly disillusioned with the promises of the politicians, regardless of what side of the aisle they sit on.  I have no hope in man. None.  As the writer to the Hebrews wrote about the ancients…

Hebrews 11:14-16 For those who say such things declare plainly that they seek a homeland. 15And truly if they had called to mind that country from which they had come out, they would have had opportunity to return. 16But now they desire a better, that is, a heavenly country. Therefore God is not ashamed to be called their God, for He has prepared a city for them.

Some might call me an escapist, and they would be right.  But please see me as a functioning escapist.  I’ll live here functionally until the day I leave.

Read more »

Feb

24

Listen Well

By pastorbillwalden

Mark 4:21-25 Also He said to them, “Is a lamp brought to be put under a basket or under a bed? Is it not to be set on a lampstand? 22For there is nothing hidden which will not be revealed, nor has anything been kept secret but that it should come to light. 23If anyone has ears to hear, let him hear.” 24Then He said to them, “Take heed what you hear. With the same measure you use, it will be measured to you; and to you who hear, more will be given. 25For whoever has, to him more will be given; but whoever does not have, even what he has will be taken away from him.”

In Mark 4, we see Jesus teaching what are known as “The Kingdom Parables”. They were illustrations about different aspects of the Kingdom of God.

In the middle of that section, Jesus instructs His listeners to “listen well”.
Here’s my understanding of what He said to them.

Read more »

May

14

Selective Ministry

By pastorbillwalden

Jesus was selective in His ministry.*
He didn’t help everybody. He didn’t respond to every human need. He didn’t accept every invitation. Sometimes he said “no”, and went in the opposite direction.

Consider this passage:
Mark 1:32-38
32At evening, when the sun had set, they brought to Him all who were sick and those who were demon-possessed. 33And the whole city was gathered together at the door. 34Then He healed many who were sick with various diseases, and cast out many demons; and He did not allow the demons to speak, because they knew Him.

35Now in the morning, having risen a long while before daylight, He went out and departed to a solitary place; and there He prayed. 36And Simon and those who were with Him searched for Him. 37When they found Him, they said to Him, “Everyone is looking for You.” 38But He said to them, “Let us go into the next towns, that I may preach there also, because for this purpose I have come forth.”

Jesus had had a full and successful day of ministry. So much so that people were lining up to get to Him. Early the next morning, he rose to pray, but the disciples found Him and urged Him to return to Capernaum, where good things were happening. He refused, and went in another direction, even though He had gained widespread acceptance in Capernaum.

Critics of the church often say things such as this: Shouldn’t the church be feeding the homeless? Shouldn’t the church be helping those bound by addictions? The list goes on about what people think the church should be doing. And when they say “church”, they mean the one that you go to. Read more »